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Cracking down in Retiree’s


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#1 Terry4

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 04:46 PM

I see the new immigration chief has announced that the income letter from the British Consulate is no longer valid for British citizens and they want actual proof.

I see many on thaivisa website forum saying they regret retiring to Thailand,it seems your not welcome to retire.

Makes me continue to think when I eventually retire in 10-15 years that the phillipines may be more attractive.

https://www.thaivisa...s-pattaya-radio

#2 Scooby

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 12:15 AM

Completely useless information. 30 pages of posts in 24 hours with ho one having any idea what they are talking about. This is typical on ThaiVisa Forum.  Tons of experts posting who don't know what they are talking about.

 

Wait 3 days and all the information will change and 90% of the posters will post the opposite of what they posted before.

 

Certainly ridiculous for anyone 10-15 years from retirement to be giving a SHIT! Even if there is a change there will be many many more supposed changes prior to you retirement.



#3 paborn

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 12:36 AM

Terry,

 

I've been reading all your posts and I'm curious. You seem to be off asking about African Types and on to the Philippines across all your posts. Has something happened?

 

When I was 15 years from retirement I was more interested in growing my funds. Places changes - this is very early.



#4 vinapu

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 08:58 AM

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I plan to retire in my own place, all seniors need - family and fruends,  pharmacy , doctors , hospital, senior residence and even cemetery are all in close proximity.

 

And if I feel urge to change scenery , airport is very short ride away, like 10 minutes. 



#5 Uranus

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 12:23 PM

I plan to retire in my own place, all seniors need - family and fruends, pharmacy , doctors , hospital, senior residence and even cemetery are all in close proximity.

And if I feel urge to change scenery , airport is very short ride away, like 10 minutes.


Yes

#6 paborn

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 06:30 PM

I plan to retire in my own place, all seniors need - family and fruends,  pharmacy , doctors , hospital, senior residence and even cemetery are all in close proximity.

 

And if I feel urge to change scenery , airport is very short ride away, like 10 minutes. 

When I wrote about retirement I spent a lot of words to say this very thing. Good show.



#7 Terry4

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 07:13 PM

Vinapu you make a very good point.

Nowadays with cheap airfares etc do we really need to retire overseas permanently..?

Of course one factor for me will be cost of living

#8 vinapu

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 07:20 PM

Nowadays with cheap airfares etc do we really need to retire overseas permanently..?

Of course one factor for me will be cost of living

Cost of living and health care should be main consideration. For most people  both are depleted over time and when we retire we usually lose that from our sight thinking we will be as healthy and well of as we are in day of retirement. 

 

Lots of unsmiling and slowly walking farang here in Pataya at the moment although no shortage of happy elderly  farangs either 



#9 Terry4

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 07:31 PM

Cost of living and health care should be main consideration. For most people  both are depleted over time and when we retire we usually lose that from our sight thinking we will be as healthy and well of as we are in day of retirement. 
 
Lots of unsmiling and slowly walking farang here in Pataya at the moment although no shortage of happy elderly  farangs either


Lol your right about the many gay unsmiling farangs .

I often wonder if many of them are now “ stuck” in Thailand,because u have to remember back in their days some of them wernt getting big retirement funds.

#10 Bob

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 10:18 AM

What is known is: 

 

(1)  The British have indeed stated that they won't issue income affidavits beginning January 1, 2019, and are recommending that Brits maintain the 800k bank accounts to support retirement visas/extensions.  Unless this new declared policy is changed, the new policy will obviously affect the Brits who have relied on the income affidavits to stay here long term. 

 

(2)  The British authorities for some reason made a comment that they know that the same change is coming for US citizens too.  While the Brits had no real business talking about what the US policy will be, I'm also doubtful that the Brits would have said that without knowing something about it (i.e., one typically can rely on what British officials say).

 

(3)  Everyone has known for years that the US embassy/consulate has been issuing the income affidavits to its citizens without any requirement that the applicant show any proof of income. But, on the other hand, I've always wondered why other countries have required the proof of income before notarizing the affidavits because the form the embassy/consulate officials sign is simply verifying the identity (and not the income amount) of the signer of the form.

 

(4)  In Chiangmai, there have been some credible reports for the last two months or so that CM Immigration officers are occasionally asking a US citizen with an income affidavit to provide some proof of that income.  So far, it's been hit and miss for that activity (but there were no prior reports of this occurring so something different is afoot).

 

What's unknown is why this is happening now.  Some have suggested (and it's inferred in some of the British statements) that the changes are occurring because of demands by Thai immigration (i.e., Thai Immigration has told the Brits that they must verify the income before issuing the affidavits and the Brits have determined that they have neither the ability or desire to spend the time/effort to verify income from various sources around the world). 

 

While I disagree with Scooby's blanket comment that it's all "completely useless information", he's right that only god/buddha knows what the immigration rules (or application of those rules) will be next month let alone the in the coming years. 

 

[OP - you plainly assert that the Thai Immigration Chief - Big Joke or whoever - made some declaration that Thai Immigration would no longer accept the British Income affidavits.  Where exactly did you find that the Thai Immigration chief said any such thing?  The only statements I've seen so far are by British officials]



#11 traveller123

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 10:35 AM

 

 

Lots of unsmiling and slowly walking farang here in Pataya at the moment although no shortage of happy elderly  farangs either 

 

You have to remember Vinapu that these same guys would almost certainly be walking slowly and unsmiling in their home countries.

I am 71 now and realise that my health will not improve as I get older, but I am convinced that life for me here with my partner and his family close by is better than it would be living alone in the UK.

The important thing for me at the moment because I live in Isaan is to be able to afford holidays, which the UK/THB exchange rate doesn't help but I can still afford



#12 vinapu

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 02:30 PM

You have to remember Vinapu that these same guys would almost certainly be walking slowly and unsmiling in their home countries.

 

Correct but probability of loneliness in  foreign country is higher than at home, particularly with friends departing to eternity and other changing company to new models.

 

Certainly we are talking about very personal decision and this each must consider based on his unique situation.

 

Success stories not necessarily will be ours and on another hand  neither somebody's bad luck will be transferred to us.

 

This is how that thing 'life' plays it's games.

 

I know quite a few farangs happily retired in Thailand but have full understanding that I took a plunge their luck would not 

necessarily transfer to me so I opt for my 4 seasons and staying in the cold for half year.



#13 faranglaw

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Posted 11 October 2018 - 11:11 PM

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I think the most underrated issue in growing old is community. It's vitally important to have a community of friends and neighbors. My Mom is 96 and living independently in Massachusetts. The closest of her three sons is a two and a half hour drive away. But she is not lonely. She has her garden, her cat, and lives in a seniors' neighborhood with wonderful neighbors who look out for each other. When she needs a ride to the doctor, she has one. When her forgetful friend Myrtle, 97, needs a ride to bingo, Mom reminds her that it's today, and drives her.

Dear Husband wants to move to Thailand eventually. My one fear about it is not having that kind of community. It does seem though, that many of you living there have developed a pretty good group, but I think vinapu's comments also make a great deal of sense.

By the way, Mom just renewed her driver's license. They gave her another five years, until she's 101!

#14 paborn

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 04:29 AM

Dear Husband wants to move to Thailand eventually. My one fear about it is not having that kind of community. It does seem though, that many of you living there have developed a pretty good group, but I think vinapu's comments also make a great deal of sense.

 

I've seen Westerners retire with their Thai BF to some country community and, personally, I think it a mistake. You'll need a local expat community to buttress you with your cultural needs and locally sourced advanced healthcare. If you move, consider that.



#15 faranglaw

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 05:00 AM

"I've seen Westerners retire with their Thai BF to some country community and, personally, I think it a mistake. You'll need a local expat community to buttress you with your cultural needs and locally sourced advanced healthcare. If you move, consider that." [/quote]

I'm a bridge player and have already made some connections through the bridge playing community, so there's some hope for connection there. And we found a condo in the Babylon neighborhood through meeting people poolside there, and I love that neighborhood, so that could work,out well, too.

Health care will be an issue, even if right now I am disgustingly healthy. If anyone knows of reasonable health insurance, I'm open to heaing about it.

But since I hauled DH to North America for twenty years, and we are married, till death do us part, for better or worse, etc., I do feel some obligstion to honor his desire to be near his aging Mom. He has done admirably well here in Canada but did not necessarily sign up as expat for life. Six months here, six months there might work. I expect this will unfold given time.

#16 vinapu

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 12:30 PM


By the way, Mom just renewed her driver's license. They gave her another five years, until she's 101!

I'm happy for your Mom but that they are doing that is outright scary. 

 

In thirties 5 years will not make much of difference but it's usually not a story in nineties. One of hardest parts of dealing with aging parents was for us to persuade my  mother than dad should stop driving as it was really nerve wrecking. Unfortunately  only getting involved in accident did the deed. And even that not right away. 



#17 kokopelli

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Posted 12 October 2018 - 05:18 PM

.

Nowadays with cheap airfares etc do we really need to retire overseas permanently..?

 

Need to or want to? There is a difference.  I don't need to retire in Thailand, I want to. I have far many friends here than back home. As for airfares, that all depends on one's financial status, cheap for one is expensive for another.



#18 faranglaw

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 06:34 AM

I'm happy for your Mom but that they are doing that is outright scary. 
 
In thirties 5 years will not make much of difference but it's usually not a story in nineties. One of hardest parts of dealing with aging parents was for us to persuade my  mother than dad should stop driving as it was really nerve wrecking. Unfortunately  only getting involved in accident did the deed. And even that not right away.


Thanks for your concern Vinapu but she'll be fine. Her sons visit frequently and test her driving. So far she's fine. She says she'll stop if we tell her to, and I believe her.

#19 kokopelli

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Posted 21 October 2018 - 03:44 PM

By the way, Mom just renewed her driver's license. They gave her another five years, until she's 101!

I hope Mom is driving an age-appropriate electric vehicle?

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#20 faranglaw

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Posted 22 October 2018 - 04:14 AM

I hope Mom is driving an age-appropriate electric vehicle?


Almost. She drives a 1999 white Cadillac (aka the boat), my 5'2" Mom in a big Old People's car left behind by her third husband. She has oulived three of them!




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